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Lowe’s Rolls Out Education and Services for Shoppers Looking to Age in Their Own Homes

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Lowe’s is aiming to become a destination for aging-in-place and life-change solutions through Lowe’s Livable Home, a new platform that will offer expertise, services and products for older customers, beginning with an online and in-store education collaboration with AARP.

Visitors to Lowes.com/LivableHome can access a virtual library of articles and videos that will be updated regularly with help from AARP. The association also will assist in training Lowe’s associates and creating in-store signage in 500 stores and 50 metro areas nationwide to support the program. Associates and managers will participate in AARP training that teaches practical skills and offers information to support customers looking to improve a home. Trained associates will wear an AARP-branded badge.

Lowe’s also is expanding its service options to customers seeking assessments through Lowe’s associates or independent service provider network. Shoppers at select locations will be able to access free virtual assessments with Lowe’s aging in place specialists. Independent service providers will be able to offer installation and ongoing customer service support for installations and remodeling, including low-threshold showers, grab bars and temporary or permanent stair lifts and ramps.

“Nearly every family in America at some point, including my own, faces the important and often intimidating responsibility of preparing a home for life’s changes,” said Marvin Ellison, Chairman and CEO of Lowe’s in a statement. “Lowe’s Livable Home is uniquely positioned to help address the customers’ desire for a one-stop destination with trusted resources and affordable solutions they need throughout every step of the journey.”

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Lowe’s is hoping to capitalize on the need for aging-in-place services. Even though 77% of people aged 50 years and older would like to stay in their homes as long as possible, fewer than 1% of U.S. homes have the necessary features to support them, according to AARP.

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