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Three Reasons The Video Camera Is The Most Important Tool For Small Businesses

  • Written by  Luis Orbegoso, ADT Business

1adtluisDid you know that businesses are four times more likely to be burglarized than homes? Often, would-be burglars believe businesses are easier targets. Beyond potential intrusions, small businesses face other day-to-day challenges such as liability and managing an efficient and trustworthy workforce.

One of a business owner’s most critical tools against these issues is a video system. And while small business security is one of video’s primary functions, businesses can also use their camera systems to maximize other critical areas — from cost savings to employee management.

Protecting Your Business With Video

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Security cameras are still a “must have” for any businesses looking to reduce the likelihood and impact of a crime; burglary and beyond. The presence of video cameras alone can deter criminals. A 2013 study from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte found that 60% of burglars chose a different target when they detected the presence of surveillance cameras.

Small business theft is more than just a single break-in. Rather, it can be a series of small losses that lead to a material impact to the bottom line. In this way, video helps drive down the number of these incremental thefts. According to the National Retail Federation, U.S. businesses experience $32 billion in shoplifting losses each year. Be sure your cameras look beyond after-hour threats or theft at point-of-sale. Visible cameras in high-traffic areas with products can also greatly deter petty theft and shoplifting. Capturing 360-degree perspectives also allows for greater coverage and monitoring of your space.

If the worst should happen, video also serves as the first line of inquiry for authorities. If a robbery is committed, video surveillance can help identify the assailant. Since 40% of thefts in small business are cash, the greatest chance of tracking and catching these thieves is via video evidence and identification.

Improve Employee Management

Beyond fighting crime, video surveillance can also make a big impact on internal affairs, from employee behavior to efficiency. When done correctly, it becomes indispensable in the training and operations of your workforce.

Because of concerns regarding employee theft, a retailer’s shoplifting risks don’t stop when the last customer leaves the store. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, approximately 75% of employees steal. Whether by directly taking product or by applying inappropriate discounts (referred to as “sweethearting”), a business owner can discourage this behavior by keeping cameras pointed behind the counter and in storage spaces. Proactive communication regarding the location of these cameras will discourage underhanded activities.

These cameras can also greatly increase employee efficiency. From maintaining the open and close of operation and processes to maximize customer interactions, video drives employee accountability even when the boss is away. Additionally, through mobile access, owners can view their staff at any moment (and employees are aware of this). This is increasingly important as businesses scale and management needs to oversee multiple store locations.

How Video Can Reduce Costs

So the camera is a must-have for security and employee management, but it can also provide deeper financial value. Business owners can maximize their security system’s impact on insurance and legal costs.

Insurance premiums can be painful for any business owner. Some insurance companies will provide discounted rates to businesses when installing video surveillance systems. A dependable indoor or outdoor surveillance system assures your insurance provider that you're taking the necessary steps to protect your business from theft, which in turn makes their job easier. Your business suddenly becomes less of a liability.

On the topic of liability, video cameras serve an invaluable purpose in preventing costly fraud. Disgruntled employees or customers may attempt to fake an injury while at your business to create a lawsuit. Physical fights between employees or harassment claims can also be clarified and appropriately handled though video evidence. Cameras can help protect your business by providing video footage of these occurrences.

As technology advances and smart devices become customized for business, ensuring you have a strong video layout should still be a top priority. Having a video system to interact with advancing IoT and mobile technologies is even better. Regardless of your business’ unique vulnerabilities, setting up a solid video surveillance system is key to running a safe and efficient business.


 

Luis Orbegoso is President of ADT Business, responsible for developing and executing the company's strategy to grow the security and automation segment serving small- and mid-sized business owners. He joined ADT in May 2013 from United Technologies Corporation (UTC) Climate, Controls & Security, where he served as president of the global fire detection and alarm segment. Prior to joining UTC, Orbegoso spent 13 years with General Electric in a variety of sales, marketing and general management roles.

Did you know that businesses are four times more likely to be burglarized than homes? Often, would-be burglars believe businesses are easier targets. Beyond potential intrusions, small businesses face other day-to-day challenges such as liability and managing an efficient and trustworthy workforce.

 

One of a business owner’s most critical tools against these issues is a video system. And while small business security is one of video’s primary functions, businesses can also use their camera systems to maximize other critical areas — from cost savings to employee management.

 

Protecting Your Business With Video

 

Security cameras are still a “must have” for any businesses looking to reduce the likelihood and impact of a crime; burglary and beyond. The presence of video cameras alone can deter criminals. A 2013 study from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte found that 60% of burglars chose a different target when they detected the presence of surveillance cameras.

 

Small business theft is more than just a single break-in. Rather, it can be a series of small losses that lead to a material impact to the bottom line. In this way, video helps drive down the number of these incremental thefts. According to the National Retail Federation, U.S. businesses experience $32 billion in shoplifting losses each year. Be sure your cameras look beyond after-hour threats or theft at point-of-sale. Visible cameras in high-traffic areas with products can also greatly deter petty theft and shoplifting. Capturing 360-degree perspectives also allows for greater coverage and monitoring of your space.

 

If the worst should happen, video also serves as the first line of inquiry for authorities. If a robbery is committed, video surveillance can help identify the assailant. Since 40% of thefts in small business are cash, the greatest chance of tracking and catching these thieves is via video evidence and identification.

 

Improve Employee Management

 

Beyond fighting crime, video surveillance can also make a big impact on internal affairs, from employee behavior to efficiency. When done correctly, it becomes indispensable in the training and operations of your workforce.

 

Because of concerns regarding employee theft, a retailer’s shoplifting risks don’t stop when the last customer leaves the store. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, approximately 75% of employees steal. Whether by directly taking product or by applying inappropriate discounts (referred to as “sweethearting”), a business owner can discourage this behavior by keeping cameras pointed behind the counter and in storage spaces. Proactive communication regarding the location of these cameras will discourage underhanded activities.

 

These cameras can also greatly increase employee efficiency. From maintaining the open and close of operation and processes to maximize customer interactions, video drives employee accountability even when the boss is away. Additionally, through mobile access, owners can view their staff at any moment (and employees are aware of this). This is increasingly important as businesses scale and management needs to oversee multiple store locations.

 

How Video Can Reduce Costs

 

So the camera is a must-have for security and employee management, but it can also provide deeper financial value. Business owners can maximize their security system’s impact on insurance and legal costs.

 

Insurance premiums can be painful for any business owner. Some insurance companies will provide discounted rates to businesses when installing video surveillance systems. A dependable indoor or outdoor surveillance system assures your insurance provider that you're taking the necessary steps to protect your business from theft, which in turn makes their job easier. Your business suddenly becomes less of a liability.

 

On the topic of liability, video cameras serve an invaluable purpose in preventing costly fraud. Disgruntled employees or customers may attempt to fake an injury while at your business to create a lawsuit. Physical fights between employees or harassment claims can also be clarified and appropriately handled though video evidence. Cameras can help protect your business by providing video footage of these occurrences.

 

As technology advances and smart devices become customized for business, ensuring you have a strong video layout should still be a top priority. Having a video system to interact with advancing IoT and mobile technologies is even better. Regardless of your business’ unique vulnerabilities, setting up a solid video surveillance system is key to running a safe and efficient business.

 

Luis Orbegoso is President of ADT Business, responsible for developing and executing the company's strategy to grow the security and automation segment serving small- and mid-sized business owners. He joined ADT in May 2013 from United Technologies Corporation (UTC) Climate, Controls & Security, where he served as president of the global fire detection and alarm segment. Prior to joining UTC, Orbegoso spent 13 years with General Electric in a variety of sales, marketing and general management roles.

 

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